Postal service

Will the U.S. Postal Service’s bipartisan bill be enough to save him? – by Jan Wondra

Earlier this week, the US Senate passed the Postal Service Reform Act (HR3076) The vote received overwhelming bipartisan support.

“The U.S. Postal Service is a lifeline for Coloradans, rural and urban,” said Sen. John Hickenlooper, who celebrated the passing with a video. “Modernizing USPS will ensure the mail is on time for generations to come. This has our stamp of approval! »

It is intended to address “the finances and operations of the United States Postal Service (USPS)”, specifically to waive the budgetary requirements placed on the service by the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act and require it to continue mail delivery six days per week. The law calls for a $107 billion overhaul of the ailing federal agency, with the aim of cutting costs and bringing more efficiency to the service on which 330 million Americans depend.

“The Senate’s passage of the Postal Service Reform Act will provide the USPS with financial stability to support more reliable delivery and service, especially to mountain and rural communities in Colorado,” the senator said. Michael Bennett. “Coloradons depend on the Postal Service to receive their prescriptions and Social Security checks, connect with loved ones, and vote. Senate passage of the Postal Service Reform Act will provide the USPS with financial stability to support more reliable delivery and service, especially in mountain and rural communities in Colorado.

The past few years have been eventful for the United States Postal Service; it suffered cuts to its services as its director applied “commercial” efficiency to a national service that added more than 10 million service points in the last decade, without budget adjustments. It was blamed for delays in delivering first-class mail and battled private competitors even as the COVID-19 pandemic ripped through the country. He was attacked by no less than former President Donald Trump in the months leading up to the 2020 election.

While people in metropolises may have other alternatives, people in rural areas depend on the post office to deliver not only greetings and bills, but also medicines and social security checks.

The law calls for a $107 billion overhaul of the ailing federal agency. Among the main provisions of the bill:

  • Requires Postal Service to maintain standard 6-day-a-week delivery
  • Requires the agency to create an online dashboard to track national delivery times
  • Allows the agency to enter into contracts with state, local and tribal leaders and governments to offer non-postal services such as hunting and fishing licenses
  • Requires future agency retirees to enroll in Medicare, which is expected to save an estimated $22.7 billion over the next decade
  • Eliminates a 2006 requirement – pre-fund health benefits for its employees, which is expected to save the agency about $27 billion over the next decade

The bill will also give the agency a major reprieve: It eliminates $57 billion in outstanding postal debt and $50 billion in payments for the next decade, including the need to prepay pensions for current and future postal workers. , which is not required of any other federal agency.

The bill is now heading to President Joe Biden’s office for signature.